Welcome to the National Tribal Water Council


The NTWC has identified its purpose in its bylaws:

"The NTWC was established to advocate for the best interests of federally-recognized Indian and Alaska Native Tribes, and Tribally-authorized organizations, in matters pertaining to water. It is the intent of the NTWC to advocate for the health and sustainability of clean and safe water, and for the productive use of water for the health and well-being of Indian Country, Indian communities, Alaska Native Tribes and Alaska Native Villages."

As 2021 begins in a few short days, the National Tribal Water Council took the opportunity to outline several key priority actions that are important and crucial to tribes. A transition brief has been developed and will be shared with the EPA, tribes, the National Tribal Caucus, National Congress of American Indians, and tribal organizations. A copy of the transition briefing document is available by clicking HERE.

As the Chairman of National Tribal Water Council (NTWC),
I welcome you to the new NTWC website.


Hello, my name is Ken Norton and I am an enrolled member of the Hoopa Valley Tribe and serve as the Director of the Hoopa Valley Tribal Environmental Protection Agency, in Hoopa, California. For those of you visiting this site for the first time, I’d like to briefly share about the National Tribal Water Council.

The NTWC was established to advocate for the best interests of federally-recognized Indian and Alaska Native Tribes in matters pertaining to water. It is the intent of the NTWC to advocate for the health and sustainability of clean water, and for the productive use of water for the health and well-being of Indian Country, Indian communities, Alaska Native Tribes, and Alaska Native Villages.

Additionally, the National Tribal Water Council is a technical and scientific body created to assist the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), federally recognized Indian Tribes, including Alaska Native Tribes, and their associated tribal communities and tribal organizations, with research and information for decision-making regarding water issues and water-related concerns that impact Indian and Alaska Native tribal members, as well as other residents of Alaska Native Villages and Indian Country in the United States. Please note: The NTWC is not a policy-making body and its input is not a substitute for government-to-government consultation.

As the NTWC’s website evolves, it will contain NTWC’s policy analysis on water related policies that impact Tribes, important water quality resources for Tribes, and current water quality news. We hope that you will continue to visit the NTWC website as it evolves to better meet the needs of all who are interested in clean and healthy water and healthy Tribal communities.

Lastly, the NTWC is pleased to have the Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals as the new administrator of the NTWC Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

I invite you to explore this website and thank you for visiting.

Sincerely,



Ken Norton, Chairman
National Tribal Water Council

Daniel Mosley (Northern Paiute/Nakota) and Rhonda (Western Shoshone/Lakota) have been married 42 years. Together, they have five children and seven grandchildren. Dan received a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science, and Rhonda a Bachelor of Arts & Master’s in Education/Literacy; both graduated from the University of Nevada, Reno. Rhonda recently retired from 27 years of teaching 2nd to 3rd grade levels primarily on the Pyramid Lake Paiute Indian Reservation. Dan & Rhonda love spending time with their children and grandchildren, golfing, walking together, and traveling.

Dan currently serves as the Executive Director of Pyramid Lake Fisheries for the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe with the goal of recovering and restoring two endemic fish species - Cui-ui (Chasmistes cujus) and the Lahontan Cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii heshawai) -native to Pyramid Lake. Dan spent 12 years overseeing the Water Quality Monitoring Program where he represented the Tribe on various water issues and developed the Tribe’s physical habitat/bioassessment program using fish/aquatic insects as indicators of water quality and riparian habitat health. He was also responsible for overseeing the USEPA approval process of the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe’s Water Quality Standards.

Stephen Wolfe (Cherokee Nation) is the environmental assistant for the Seneca-Cayuga Nation. In this role, he participates in many department functions including water monitoring, cultural/environmental education, and solid waste management. In addition, Stephen serves as a tribal trustee on the Tar Creek Trustee Council of Indian Tribes, which works on issues surrounding the Tar Creek Superfund Site located upstream of Grand Lake o’ the Cherokees, and serves as the Region 6 Representative to the National Tribal Toxics Council.

Stephen received his Bachelor of Integrated Studies with an emphasis on Sustainability, Society, and Resource Management from Pittsburg State University in 2017, and he is now pursuing a Master of Environmental Science from the University of Oklahoma with an emphasis in Hydrology and Water Security. There he hopes to expand his knowledge and understanding of how water issues uniquely affect tribal populations. In his spare time, Stephen is an active outdoorsman. His favorite pastimes include kayaking and hiking, with ample breaks to forage for wild edible plants and fungi.



The National Tribal Water Council is funded through a grant from the US Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Water and administered by the Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals at Northern Arizona University.

Contact Us


National Tribal Water Council (NTWC)
PO Box 15004
Flagstaff, AZ 86011-5004
(928) 523-9555
NTWC Priorities List [pdf]
NTWC brochure [pdf]
Visit our Facebook page.


NTWC 2020/2021 Transition Brief
NTWC's 2020/2021 Tribal Water Priorities
Policy Response Kits
Tribal Advisory Committee
Grants Opportunities


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